Here's a short video of why we do what we do…

what we do:

We are the only organization within the county that is focused directly on efforts to help private land owners with their land issues.

  • Provide scholarships for Camp Rocky Conservation Camp for 14-19 year olds

  • Provide college scholarships for high school students interested in pursuing a natural resource or agricultural degree.

  • We receive approximately 200 area subdivision reviews per year and advise on their impact regarding soil, water, plant and other natural resources.

  • Inspect and maintain area watershed dams

  • Advise on custom grass seed mixes

  • Advise on mitigation of soil loss situations due to blowing or eroding soil

  • Provide little to free of charge educational workshops and classes on conservation topics to local landowners and members of our urban community.

  • Work with partnering agencies to restore, rebuild and prevent fires in our community

  • Hold educational workshops regarding reforestation.

  • Provide free of charge educational classes on conservation topics to local students, kindergarten through twelfth grade, including the Natural Resource Conservation Service’s (NRCS) Soil Tunnel, as well as hosting the district wide 6th grade Conservation Poster Contest.

  • Partner with the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) as the local USDA Service Center for conservation and technical assistance programs to small, rural landowners in El Paso County; which includes: water quality and quantity, soil health, erosion by wind and water, information on noxious weeds, information on crop, pasture and range management, windbreak plantings, wetland stabilization, flood mitigation, forest restoration and many other practices that natural resource concerns.

  • Partner and Collaborate with other groups and organizations

Natural Resource Priority Areas:

Soil Health

Erosion Prevention

Water Quality & Quantity

Forestry restoration and management

Ag land Preservation

Range Management

Invasive and Noxious Weeds

Conservation Education

Wildlife Habitat

Land Use Planning

Environmental Disaster Response

Black Forest is a census-designated place in El Paso County, Colorado, near Colorado Springs. The population was 13,116 at the 2010 census. Black Forest is named such for the high density of Ponderosa Pines located in a generally small area. In 2006, residents voted against a proposal to incorporate as a city

Black Forest is a census-designated place in El Paso County, Colorado, near Colorado Springs. The population was 13,116 at the 2010 census. Black Forest is named such for the high density of Ponderosa Pines located in a generally small area. In 2006, residents voted against a proposal to incorporate as a city

In a little over a week in 2013, the Black Forest Fire -- considered the most destructive in state history -- devoured 489 homes and killed two people

In a little over a week in 2013, the Black Forest Fire -- considered the most destructive in state history -- devoured 489 homes and killed two people

On June 11, 2013, a small fire in Black Forest, Colorado, quickly turned into an inferno, rapidly moving east, and then on June 12, turned north. It consumed 15,000 acres, over 500 homes, and 2 lives. It is the most destructive fire in Colorado history, and occurred only 1 year after the devastating Waldo Canyon fire.

On June 11, 2013, a small fire in Black Forest, Colorado, quickly turned into an inferno, rapidly moving east, and then on June 12, turned north. It consumed 15,000 acres, over 500 homes, and 2 lives. It is the most destructive fire in Colorado history, and occurred only 1 year after the devastating Waldo Canyon fire.

July 2015 in June, as the giant Black Forest fire near Colorado Springs, Colorado, was just being contained, I wrote about a tiny, brightly colored, fire-dependent moth,  Schinia masoni , the Colorado Firemoth. If you want to see this moth, I wrote, go out in early summer to an area along the Colorado Front Range that has burned in the last few years, and you are likely to see lots of Blanketflowers,  Gaillardia aristata,  which tend to bloom profusely for a few years after fires in the foothills pine woods. If you are lucky and sharp-eyed you will find the Colorado Firemoth hiding on these red and yellow flowers in its brightly colored, red and yellow camouflage.  Courtesy of Bruce Byers.

July 2015 in June, as the giant Black Forest fire near Colorado Springs, Colorado, was just being contained, I wrote about a tiny, brightly colored, fire-dependent moth, Schinia masoni, the Colorado Firemoth. If you want to see this moth, I wrote, go out in early summer to an area along the Colorado Front Range that has burned in the last few years, and you are likely to see lots of Blanketflowers, Gaillardia aristata, which tend to bloom profusely for a few years after fires in the foothills pine woods. If you are lucky and sharp-eyed you will find the Colorado Firemoth hiding on these red and yellow flowers in its brightly colored, red and yellow camouflage.

Courtesy of Bruce Byers.

Blanketfowers ( Schinia masoni  on  Gaillardia aristate)

Blanketfowers (Schinia masoni on Gaillardia aristate)

and now…………..

and now…………..

afterthefire.jpg
daylillypic.jpg

EPCCD also partners with Garden Clubs to host educational workshops on healthy soils so we can all have the opportunity to grow vegetables and flowers. These classes and workshops are free to the public.

EPCCD partners with NRCS and The NRCS Soil Scientist, Jeff Goats, where we go to local schools with the soil tunnel and educate students on the importance of healthy soil.

EPCCD partners with NRCS and The NRCS Soil Scientist, Jeff Goats, where we go to local schools with the soil tunnel and educate students on the importance of healthy soil.

We also brought Jeff and the soil tunnel to our Ag Fair last year which was held at Bristol Brewery in front of the old Ivywild school in Colorado Springs

We also brought Jeff and the soil tunnel to our Ag Fair last year which was held at Bristol Brewery in front of the old Ivywild school in Colorado Springs

At EPCCD’s AG Fair last year are L to R board member Sec/Treasurer Katie Miller, Kailee Barker, volunteer, VP John Eastlake, President Ken Barker and Vogl Farms owner. William Vogl.

At EPCCD’s AG Fair last year are L to R board member Sec/Treasurer Katie Miller, Kailee Barker, volunteer, VP John Eastlake, President Ken Barker and Vogl Farms owner. William Vogl.

2019 Edible Landscape Workshop with the 3 amigos L to R Jeff Goats, NRCS Soil Scientist, Ken Barker, EPCCD Board President, and Deric Clemons, NRCS District Conservationist. Great class and a good turnout.

2019 Edible Landscape Workshop with the 3 amigos L to R Jeff Goats, NRCS Soil Scientist, Ken Barker, EPCCD Board President, and Deric Clemons, NRCS District Conservationist. Great class and a good turnout.

Waldo Canyon Loop Trail [CLOSED] is a 6.5 mile heavily trafficked loop trail located near Cascade, Colorado that features beautiful wild flowers and is rated as moderate. This photo is pre-waldo fire.

Waldo Canyon Loop Trail [CLOSED] is a 6.5 mile heavily trafficked loop trail located near Cascade, Colorado that features beautiful wild flowers and is rated as moderate. This photo is pre-waldo fire.

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The Waldo Canyon fire was a forest fire that started approximately 4 miles (6.4 km) northwest of Colorado Springs, Colorado on June 23, 2012, and was declared 100 percent contained on July 10, 2012, after no smoke plumes were visible on a small portion of the containment line on Blodgett Peak. The fire was active in the Pike National Forest and adjoining areas, covering a total of 18,247 acres (29 sq mi; 74 km2).[2] The fire had caused the evacuation of over 32,000 residents of Colorado Springs, Manitou Springs and Woodland Park, several small mountain communities along the southwestern side of Highway 24, and partial evacuation of the United States Air Force Academy.[3][4] There were 346 homes destroyed by the fire.[5] U.S. Highway 24, a major east-west road, was closed in both directions

Waldo Canyon now. Rebuild is underway but the trail is closed. This is why we partner with Federal,State and local agencies on forest restoration, forest sustainability, and hold workshops like the  Ponderosa pine-alooza, forest conservation that protects your home, community, and watershed.

Waldo Canyon now. Rebuild is underway but the trail is closed. This is why we partner with Federal,State and local agencies on forest restoration, forest sustainability, and hold workshops like the Ponderosa pine-alooza, forest conservation that protects your home, community, and watershed.